Understanding This New Art Movement of Defacement Part 5

Bending Toward Cubism?

Defacement 

Previous Part 4

Back to the Beginning Part 1

So I am re-examining the connection between some of the contemporary art and previous art movements.  There seem to be some definite similarities between cubism and some of the contemporary art that appears “defaced”.  First some classical cubism –  click on all the images to go to where the images originated.  Also as always if you want me to remove any of your art email me at clisawork@gmail.com and I will take down your art right away.  All artwork is attributed to the original artist.

Portrait de Ambroise Vollard by Pablo Picasso 1910
Portrait de Ambroise Vollard by Pablo Picasso 1910

Cubism is also figurative art – that is it art that actually reflects a person, an animal a place. It isn’t an idea of a place, or an idea of a person.  It is a real, often specific person.  Cubism attempts to show more than just one dimension of a person by showing slices of different space – as if you took a picture from different directions of the same thing and then tried to splice them together to create a three dimensional picture, but also including the picture over time.  Sometimes it explodes an object to show multiple view of it, inside and out, trying to show multiple aspects of it at once.  Here are more works of cubism:

Nude Descending a Staircase - Marcel Duchamp
Nude Descending a Staircase – Marcel Duchamp

 

The Guitar by Jaun Gris
The Guitar by Jaun Gris

 

Flowers by Alice Bailey 1915
Flowers by Alice Bailey 1915

 

The links to contemporary art often seem more stylistic than theoretical – not quite the right word.  I don’t know if these following works were created with the same intent – to explore the figure in more than one dimension, in more than one time.    This seems inadequate.  Perhaps the the artwork will help clarify.  The following are contemporary works – done in the last 10 years.

 

Die Orestie des Aischylos  (The Oresteia of Aeschylus) by Dennis Scholl Germany 2012
Die Orestie des Aischylos (The Oresteia of Aeschylus) by Dennis Scholl Germany 2012

 

LIke There's No Tomorrow by Ronald Ashburn USA 2011
LIke There’s No Tomorrow by Ronald Ashburn USA 2011

 

untitled Sergey Vlasov Russian Federation 2010
untitled Sergey Vlasov Russian Federation 2010

 

The last example is three dimensional.  This raises the question is all art that is three dimensional cubism?  No, because alot of 3D art is straight forward, with using pieces of the art to try and represent what is being presented at different places in space or time.

 

I can't quite remember but I never forget by Andrew Salgado Canada 2014
I can’t quite remember but I never forget by Andrew Salgado Canada 2014

 

There is in the above work the sense of the figure over time and place, a sense of movement, like in cubism.  This next piece stretches the definitions of cubism to its limits (OK I wouldn’t pass a test with this) – but it has that same sense of transcending time – expanding beyond one mere instance in time or space.  It does not have the flat 2 dimensional feel of traditional cubism – but it is contemporary art (which is not actually a movement like modern art, or is it?)

 

"For a Minute there I lost myself" Gerrel Saunders Italy 2014
“For a Minute there I lost myself” Gerrel Saunders Italy 2014

 

This next piece is in the spirit of cubism in that it seems to represent more than one  aspect of a portrait by combining a portrait with calligraphy – again a stretch but still going beyond a straight forward portrait to show more than one time or perspective in space.  Also some of cubism is like collage – multimedia.   Well, judge for yourself.

 

لا تُعاتبني فِيما  ليس لي حيلةٌ فيه at Loghat Tumblr
لا تُعاتبني فِيما ليس لي حيلةٌ فيه at Loghat Tumblr

 

Next –

Part 6 – Smeared – Trying to Understand the Art of Defacement Part 6

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