Art, gif art, Holiday, Music, Painting

Artwork that Moves – GIF art from Feel Desain

The Mona Lisa -  Original Art by Leonardo da Vinci 1504 GIF by  Feel Desain
The Mona Lisa – Original Art by Leonardo da Vinci 1504 GIF by Feel Desain

For original artwork go HERE

The online magazine Feel Desain has created a series of GIF art using what they call “Revived Art”.  This includes works like The Mona Lisa, Edvard Munch’s The Scream, and a portrait of Marilyn Monroe by Andy Warhol.  See more of this work at Feel Desain HERE or on their Instagram Account HERE. Thanks to Fubiz!

The Scream - Edvard Munch 1893 Original Artwork - Gif art by Feel Desain
The Scream – Edvard Munch 1893 Original Artwork – Gif art by Feel Desain

For original artwork go HERE

From "The Birth of Venus" by  Sandro Botticelli
From “The Birth of Venus” by Sandro Botticelli

See original artwork HERE


The Girl with a Pearl Earring - Johannes Vermeer
The Girl with a Pearl Earring – Johannes Vermeer

For original artwork see HERE


Self Portrait - Vincent van Gogh
Self Portrait – Vincent van Gogh

For original artwork see HERE


Vertumnus (Emperor Rudolph II) - by   Giuseppe Arcimboldo
Vertumnus (Emperor Rudolph II) – by Giuseppe Arcimboldo

See original work HERE


One Version of Andy Warhol - Portrait of Marilyn Monroe
One Version of Andy Warhol’s Portrait of Marilyn Monroe

The closest to this version of the Marilyn Monroe portrait I could find was part of a Diptych by Andy Warhol at the Tate Musuem HERE.  Here is there explanation:

Marilyn Monroe died in August 1962. In the following four months, Warhol made more than twenty silkscreen paintings of her, all based on the same publicity photograph from the 1953 film Niagara. Warhol found in Monroe a fusion of two of his consistent themes: death and the cult of celebrity. By repeating the image, he evokes her ubiquitous presence in the media. The contrast of vivid colour with black and white, and the effect of fading in the right panel are suggestive of the star’s mortality. Via The Tate Musuem

Because there are so many versions of this same image, this may have come from a different version.  It is difficult to tell – but the version at the Tate has the same orange background.


 

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