Spring

“Francis Picabia; born Francis-Marie Martinez de Picabia, 22 January 1879 – 30 November 1953) was a French avant-garde painter, poet and typographist. After experimenting with Impressionism and… Read more “Spring”

Translating Poetry into Pictures – Emily Dickinson’s “Wild nights – Wild nights!”

Minerva by Alex Cherry
Minerva by Alex Cherry

 

 

The artist Shinseungback Kimyonghun’s work, “The God’s Script” (HERE) took a piece of a text and then matched each word from that text with the first image that came up in a Google Images search for that word.   For this I will be translating the text of Emily Dickinson’s poem “Wild nights – Wild nights!” (Full Text)into pictures using the same method.  Much like my previous attempt with Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Raven” (HERE)   Some of the picture results are obvious but some of the pictures left me scratching my head. These search results will obviously change over time resulting in different pictures.  For the links to all the pictures used – https://clisawrite.wordpress.com/links-for-emily-dickinson-poetry-to-images/

Wild nights – Wild nights! (269)
BY EMILY DICKINSON

 

Wild nights – Wild nights!
Were I with thee
Wild nights should be
Our luxury!

 

Futile – the winds –
To a Heart in port –
Done with the Compass –
Done with the Chart!

 

Rowing in Eden –
Ah – the Sea!
Might I but moor – tonight –
In thee!

 

 

Wild
Wild
nights
nights
dash
dash

 

 

 

Were
Were

 

thee
thee

 

should
should

 

be
be

 

our
our

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

dash
dash

 

compass
compass
dash
dash

 

 

chart
chart

 

Exclamation Point
Exclamation Point

 

 

dash
dash

 

 

 

Might
Might

 

 

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Emily Dickinson
Emily Dickinson

 

The Solace of Artemis

Reblogged from Biophilia Hypothesis

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Photograph: Paul Souders/Corbis

 

The Guardian: A climate change poem for today:

“The Solace of Artemis”

by Paula Meehan

For Catriona Crowe

I read that every polar bear alive has mitochondrial DNA
from a common mother, an Irish brown bear who once
roved out across the last ice age, and I am comforted.
It has been a long hot morning with the children of the machine,

their talk of memory, of buying it, of buying it cheap, but I,
memory keeper by trade, scan time coded in the golden hive mind
of eternity. I burn my books, I burn my whole archive:
a blaze that sears, synapses flaring cell to cell where

memory sleeps in the wax hexagonals of my doomed and melting comb.
I see him loping towards me across the vast ice field
to where I wait in the cave mouth, dreaming my cubs about the den,
my honied ones, smelling of snow and sweet oblivion.

 

 

Beautifully Rendered – Art by Curious3D

Guardian - Digital Art by Cynthia Decker (Curious3D)
Guardian – Digital Art by Cynthia Decker (Curious3D)

Cynthia Decker (known online as Curious3D) creates amazing digital art.  Her work is entirely digitally created, with meticulous detail focusing on the natural world.   Her work is graceful and imaginative.  See more work by Cynthia Decker HERE.

Haiku by Cynthia Decker
Haiku by Cynthia Decker

 

Haiku of Digital Art

Lisa Cox

Dark digital world
Where seeds of ones and zeroes
Blossom into life

 

Welcome to the Jungle – Painting by Eric Roux-Fontaine

Another Country  by Alex Roux-Fontaine
Another Country by Alex Roux-Fontaine

Eric Roux-Fontaine is a French artist.  His work has a lush, overgrown quality.  He transforms ordinary scenes into something magical.  You can see more of Eric Roux-Fontaine’s work HERE and at his website HERE. Previous Post with Eric Roux-Fontaine’s work HERE.

Nocturne Indien II by Eric Roux-Fontaine
Nocturne Indien II by Eric Roux-Fontaine

 

 

 

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National Poetry Month is Coming!

Here’s a Preview

A Thing of Beauty (Endymion)

John Keats

A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
Its lovliness increases; it will never
Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing
A flowery band to bind us to the earth,
Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth
Of noble natures, of the gloomy days,
Of all the unhealthy and o’er-darkn’d ways
Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all,
Some shape of beauty moves away the pall
From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon,
Trees old and young, sprouting a shady boon
For simple sheep; and such are daffodils
With the green world they live in; and clear rills
That for themselves a cooling covert make
‘Gainst the hot season; the mid-forest brake,
Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk-rose blooms:
And such too is the grandeur of the dooms
We have imagined for the mighty dead;
An endless fountain of immortal drink,
Pouring unto us from the heaven’s brink.

For Dawn

The Dawn spacecraft observed Ceres for an hour on Jan. 13, 2015, from a distance of 238,000 miles (383,000 kilometers). A little more than half of its surface was observed at a resolution of 27 pixels. This animated GIF shows bright and dark features. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI
The Dawn spacecraft observed Ceres for an hour on Jan. 13, 2015, from a distance of 238,000 miles (383,000 kilometers). A little more than half of its surface was observed at a resolution of 27 pixels. This animated GIF shows bright and dark features.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI

I am Dawn

Lisa Cox

I am Dawn
Traversing endless
Night
As the monarch
Migrates
With slow
But steady flutters
So I have made
My journey
Slow and steady
In this field
Of starry flowers
Coming to rest
Round smallest gem
Ceres
Listen while
I whisper back
All Ceres’ secrets
I am dawn
Small light
In endless night

This animation showcases a series of images NASA's Dawn spacecraft took on approach to Ceres on Feb. 4, 2015 at a distance of about 90,000 miles (145,000 kilometers) from the dwarf planet. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI
This animation showcases a series of images NASA’s Dawn spacecraft took on approach to Ceres on Feb. 4, 2015 at a distance of about 90,000 miles (145,000 kilometers) from the dwarf planet.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI